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Residents with Bad Water

CLIMATE CHANGE
What Do Latinos Really Care About? Mi Tierra

It’s election season and the news is full of headlines about the issues most on the minds of voters. And for candidates trying to woo Latino voters, there’s nothing more important than immigration, right? Wrong. Poll after poll shows Latinos are more concerned about the effects of climate change than voters overall and that reducing smog and air pollution, conserving water, and protecting waterways and clean drinking water scored higher than immigration reform. Politicians would do well to pay attention—or pay the consequences.
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CLIMATE CHANGE
These First Climate Scientists Didn't Know About Global Warming

Mary, George IX and William Vaux were out for a fun train ride in the Canadian Rockies. What they saw captivated them—massive glaciers visible from a railway reststop. The took lots of photos and even measurements. Seven years later, when they returned they were shocked at what they found. Learn how a dining stop led to a lifetime of research, and gave rise to—unbeknownst to them—our first climate scientists.
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ENERGY
Forgotten: Did the State of Colorado Leave Residents with Bad Water?

Gas drilling came to the Raton Basin of southern Colorado in the late 1990s and along with it heavy traffic, noise—and what many locals believe—contaminated water. Numerous residents had discovered they had a chemical in their water, "tert-Butyl alcohol" or "TBA." The COGCC, the state agency that regulates oil and gas activities, investigated and published a report suggesting TBA was naturally occurring, among other explanations. Now the case is closed and the report, not only leaves more questions than it answers—it resigns residents to live with water they feel they dare not drink.
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May 22, 2016

Last week the water level in Lake Mead sunk to its lowest since the reservoir was built in the 1930s. And if that weren't bad enough, there's another ripple.

Meanwhile, one of the driest cities in the U.S. is allowing Nestlé to bottle water there.

According to the CDC, this may be one of your most risky summer activities.

In a while, crocodile. Florida immigration problem puzzles scientists.

Those stories and more on H2O Radio's weekly news report about water.

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